“Safe Harbor”: Merit Management’s Footnote 2 Is Back! (Deutsche v. McCormick)

Safe harbor (photo by Marilyn Swanson) By: Donald L Swanson In its unanimous Merit Management Group, LP v.FTI Consuting, Inc., opinion of February 27, 2018, the U.S. Supreme Court held (in the second-to-last sentence of the opinion): “Because the parties do not contend that either Valley View or Merit is a ‘financial institution’ or other covered... Continue Reading →

Prof. Mann: On Bankruptcy And The U.S. Supreme Court (An Interview)

https://youtu.be/g1NZFVfJ98k Prof. Mann discussing "Bankruptcy and the U.S. Supreme Court" By: Donald L Swanson Ronald J. Mann is the “Albert E. Cinelli Enterprise Professor of Law” and co-director of the “Charles Evans Gerber Transactional Studies Center” at Columbia Law School.  Prof. Mann is a nationally recognized scholar in bankruptcy and related areas of law.  His prior... Continue Reading →

How U.S. Constitution’s Contracts Clause Bans State Bankruptcy Laws (Sturges v. Crowninshield)

Filling the void (photo by Marilyn Swanson) By: Donald L Swanson “No State shall . . . pass any . . . Law impairing the Obligation of Contracts.” --U.S. Constitution, Art. 1, Sec. 10, Cl. 1 (the “Contracts Clause”). One of the earliest opinions from the U.S. Supreme Court on the subject of bankruptcy is Sturges... Continue Reading →

Judge Wedoff: On Representing Respondents At Supreme Court In Chicago v. Fulton (An Interview)

By: Donald L Swanson On January 14, 2021, the U.S. Supreme Court issued its majority and concurring opinions in the City of Chicago v. Fulton case.  The opinions give a technical victory to the City on a narrow legal issue but suggest that the City may be in a difficult position on a variety of related... Continue Reading →

Supreme Court Denies Cert (GE v. Belton): A Bankruptcy Code v. Arbitration Act Reprieve — And Constitution’s Bankruptcy Exception

Uniformity (photo by Marilyn Swanson) By: Donald L Swanson We've dodged the bullet . . . again! Yesterday, the U.S. Supreme Court denied certiorari in GE Capital Retail Bank v. Belton (Case No. 20-481), where the question presented is: Which federal statutory scheme takes precedence in resolving important bankruptcy issues -- the Bankruptcy Code or the... Continue Reading →

Bankruptcy Code Meets Federal Arbitration Act — At U.S. Supreme Court? (GE v. Belton)

Uniformity (photo by Marilyn Swanson) By: Donald L Swanson Uh-oh!  The U.S. Supreme Court is requiring action on a certiorari petition that presents a Bankruptcy Code meets Federal Arbitration Act (“FAA”) question. Here is what’s happened: November 10, 2014:  SDNY Bankruptcy Judge, Hon. Robert D. Drain, refuses to allow arbitration of a Debtor’s request to hold... Continue Reading →

U.S. Solicitor General: A POWERFUL AND BIASED Advocate Before the U.S. Supreme Court on Bankruptcy Issues (Deutsche Bank v. McCormick Foundation)

Unbiased justice (photo by Marilyn Swanson) By: Donald L Swanson The Acting Solicitor General is invited to file a brief in this case expressing the views of the United States [on whether to grant the Petition for Writ of Certiorari]. --From U.S. Supreme Court docket entry dated October 5, 2020, in Deutsche Bank v. McCormick Foundation... Continue Reading →

How Is Refusing A Turnover Request Not “Exercising Control Over”? (City of Chicago v. Fulton)

City of Chicago (Photo by Marilyn Swanson) By: Donald L Swanson So . . . I’m reading through the transcript of oral arguments at the U.S. Supreme Court on City of Chicago v. Fulton (Case No. 19-357) from October 13, 2020.  The first thing that jumps out at me, three pages in, is this: there is... Continue Reading →

U.S. Solicitor General: A Biased Advocate Before The U.S. Supreme Court On Bankruptcy Issues–Again (City of Chicago v. Fulton)

City of Chicago (Photo by Marilyn a Swanson) By: Donald L Swanson The case before the U.S. Supreme Court is City of Chicago v. Fulton, Case No. 19-357.  It is scheduled for oral argument on Tuesday, October 13, 2020. Facts The essential facts are these: City of Chicago impounds Fulton’s car to collect fines and penalties... Continue Reading →

Bankruptcy Laws v. Insolvency Laws: A Debtors’ Prison Distinction (Sturges v. Crowninshield)

Flying high (photo by Marilyn Swanson) By: Donald L Swanson Over the past two hundred and thirty years, the United States of America has been flying high on a massive economic expansion, punctuated periodically by times of economic stress or crisis. Bankruptcy laws have struggled to keep pace with the expansion and occasional turmoil. An earliest... Continue Reading →

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